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Kong Qinpan Qinpan din New York din New York

Cititor Kong Qinpan Qinpan din New York

Kong Qinpan Qinpan din New York

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Pentru o carte care este de generații vechi, mi-a plăcut să citesc asta. Pot vedea copii între clasa întâi și a treia care s-ar bucura de această carte, din cauza personajelor implicate în poveste. Personajul principal al poveștii încearcă să-i facă șepci, dar o grămadă de maimuțe au luat șepcile de la el. Se poate observa că ilustrațiile din această poveste nu sunt ale vremurilor actuale, ci ale anilor șaptezeci. Multe dintre culorile utilizate sunt culori simple și nu mai multe culori vii, așa cum ați putea vedea în cartea de astăzi. Cu toate acestea, ilustrațiile erau încă destul de fine; maimuțele care apar în poveste vor face cu siguranță orice copii să chicotească așa cum îi văd în carte. Povestea are ritm repetat, ceea ce am crezut că a făcut povestea mult mai distractivă de citit. Copiii se vor raporta cu ușurință la personajul principal (un ambulant) care se frustrează, deoarece alte persoane (sau maimuțe în acest caz) au lucrurile sale. La sfârșitul poveștii, maimuțele au cedat în cele din urmă și i-au dat înapoi șepcile. Frumoasă poveste.

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Alright, let’s get right into the book reviews I have for today. This series comes from the amazing Scott Westerfeld and I have been reading it for years-literally. I finally found the inspiration to finish it and I have some thoughts to share with you. The series is know collectively as the Uglies Trilogy (even though there are four!) and it includes Uglies, Pretties, Specials, and Extras. They were published between 2005 and 2009 and average around four hundred pages each. The series is dystopian and set in a post-Rusties (that’s us) America. Despite its YA rating, the series has some interesting jabs at our society’s blatant destruction of the world around us. With themes including corrupt governments hell-bent on maintaining power by keeping the people in a state of altered reality while at the same time experimenting on indigenous populations and brainwashing, these novels really bring to light some interesting commentary on the state of our existence and what it might be like if our society doesn’t curb its appetite for pollution and environmental mayhem. While I’m sure the future won’t play out exactly as Westerfeld has written it (hopefully no one discovers the recipe for making oil-eating bacteria), his prose is still relevant to our society and I could see so much of us in the “futuristic” characters. Overall, the series was entertaining and thought-provoking. The reader definitely had a sense of the underlying message of our destructive nature. It wasn’t all Big Brother and the environment though, there were some awesome fight scenes and hover boards! Plus, an entire new language of slang that was bubbly-making indeed (despite some of the bogus events of the novels). The series is certainly worth reading, especially if dystopian novels are your thing, or you enjoy pulling tricks. I would give the series a rating of at least a mega-Helen (that’s for you Zane because you were my favorite!).