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Berk Yurdusever Yurdusever din Hatiya, Nepal din Hatiya, Nepal

Cititor Berk Yurdusever Yurdusever din Hatiya, Nepal

Berk Yurdusever Yurdusever din Hatiya, Nepal

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The Night's Dawn Trilogy is my second experience with Hamilton's writing. A couple of years ago, I read Pandora's Star, and immediately decided to own that book. Now, understand that as an employee of a public library, book purchases don't happen frequently, so. . . but I digress. The Reality Dysfunction was my least favorite of the three. It takes a while to get into the actual meat of the story, and a lot of it is honestly kind of smutty. By the end of the book though, I was completely hooked. Once the plot is underway, it's completely nonstop. " There's ultimately little development in the majority of the characters, and only a small percentage successfully can be described as sympathetic. However, this is offset by sheer quantity of players. There are a lot of characters and subplots keeping the story fresh, though it can be confusing to try to keep track of everyone. Hamilton more or less ties everything together in the end; I think the Deus Ex Machina ending actually fits due to the overwhelming despair and hopelessness portrayed in the books. I found myself thinking time and again, "Can something good please happen now? Look, those people are already doomed, didja really have to throw something new on top of their troubles??" These books should hold great appeal to F/SF readers looking for something substantial. While Hamilton gives the impression of knowing his science, you'll still want to check your disbelief at the door and just sit back and enjoy a great ride -er, read. -Brian